Tag Archives: toronto personal injury lawyer

By using technology, laptops can replace briefcases

As seen on AdvocateDaily.com

Making use of technology ensures efficiency and productivity remain at peak levels, even during time periods that may otherwise be wasted, Toronto critical injury lawyer John McLeish says in Lawyers Weekly.

In an article discussing working on the go, McLeish says if he’s travelling, he always has a laptop in tow.

If stuck on a plane for three hours without the ability to connect remotely, because the firm has a paperless office, files can easily be downloaded, says McLeish.

“Instead of having two briefcases in the overhead luggage compartment above me, I have a 2.8-pound computer. I can download five, 10 or 25 files so I have them on the plane,” McLeish, a partner with McLeish Orlando LLP, says in the article.

The firm makes use of today’s latest technology, including Primafact, a paperless office system that enables lawyers to instantly access any document in a client’s file, the article says.

“There’s no running around saying, ‘Get me this document.’ We can access everything so quickly,” says McLeish.

When on a trip, McLeish says he’ll often get work done in the lobby of his hotel in the early morning hours.

 

For more information about McLeish Orlando click here

Safe streets concept could reduce fatalities

As seen on AdvocateDaily.com

Streets designed to take every mode of transportation into account – dubbed complete streets – are safer for the drivers, cyclists and pedestrians travelling on them, Toronto critical injury lawyer Patrick Brown says in Law Times.

In the article, Brown discusses the 2012 cycling death review and the 2012 pedestrian death review, and the coroner’s office move to call for the adoption of complete streets.

“The complete streets concept has been around for a while,” Brown says in Law Times.

“It has been adopted in various jurisdictions in the U.S. Put simply, it provides that anyone involved in the construction, building, maintenance or design of any type of roads provide equal access and equal consideration for all users, especially in urban centres. Complete streets are designed to give cyclists and pedestrians their own space so they can avoid contact.”

The cycling death review examined all of the 129 accidental cycling deaths that occurred in Ontario between Jan. 1, 2006, and Dec. 31, 2010, the article says, while the pedestrian death review examined 95 cases of preventable pedestrian collisions in 2010, including the 23 deaths that occurred in January of that year.

The Ministry of Transportation is currently in the process of developing a cycling strategy and is moving forward with implementing the coroner’s recommendations, the report says.

“We are hoping for a complete streets policy statement directing the road authorities to adopt the concept,” Brown, partner with McLeish Orlando LLP, says in the article.

“There is no doubt in my mind that if they do, we will have the safest roads in North America and a substantial reduction in fatalities.”

 

Researching a Google Reader replacement

As seen on AdvocateDaily.com

 

As Google Reader prepares to retire as of July 1, lawyers who use the service to track news in their practice areas are trying new tools, like Flipboard’s social news magazine, recently tested by Toronto critical injury lawyer Rikin Morzaria for a Law Times article on the topic.

“I loved it as a recreational reading tool. It’s somewhat limited using it as a tool to keep up to date with cases and other legal research,” Morzaria, partner with McLeish Orlando LLP, says in the article.

“The visual display is beautiful and it makes it a pleasant experience to read through decisions but it doesn’t let you see at a glance which decisions are new, which ones you’ve already started reading, and which ones you’ve already read.

“I’ve tried Netvibes, too, which is pretty comparable to Google Reader and you can use it offline.”

Google announced its decision to shut down the popular RSS feed reader in March, citing declining users, Law Times reports.

 

Decision could lead to increase in unnecessary claims

As seen on AdvocateDaily.com – April 5, 2013

Ontario’s personal injury bar is concerned that a recent Court of Appeal decision could lead to an increase in unnecessary claims against underinsured insurers, Toronto critical injury lawyers Rikin Morzaria and John McLeish write in Lawyers Weekly. Read Lawyers Weekly

In Roque v. Pilot Insurance Co. [2012], the court held that a plaintiff ’s limitation period against an underinsured insurer begins to run when the plaintiff has enough evidence to give him a “reasonable chance” of persuading a judge that his claims would exceed the minimum limits of $200,000, the article says.

“This is a departure from some previous cases — Hampton v. Traders General Insurance Co. [1996] O.J. No. 41, most notably — that held that the limitation period only begins to run from the time when the plaintiff knows that the available insurance coverage under a defendant’s policy is less than that available under his or her own coverage. While the language of OPCF 44 endorsement in question — the “family protection” endorsement that extends to the policyholder the same rights provided to third parties —  arguably left the appeal court little choice, the resulting situation cries out for legislative intervention,” explain Morzaria and McLeish, partners with McLeish Orlando LLP.

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